Monolaurin (Lauric Acid) 600mg 90 Capsules by Ecological Formulas

Product Code: EF-ML600-90C

Availability:In stock

£29.99 29.99
  • Monolaurin - Antivirus supplement to help fight colds, flu, shingles, herpes, Epstein-Barr Virus, chronic fatigue syndrome.
  • May help protect the immune system from a range of infectious agents.
  • No antibiotics - Does not destroy friendly bacteria.
  • Monolaurin is good for both one-time and long-term preventative use.
  • Extracted from coconut oil

 

Supplemental Facts for 300 mg Capsules
Serving Size: 1 Capsule
Servings per Container: 90
Main Ingredients

Amount Per Serving 

% Daily Allowance

Calcium (phosphate)  106 mg 10%
Monolaurin 600 mg *
Inosine  7.5 mg *
Percent Daily Values are Based on a 2000 Calorie Diet

*Daily Value Not Established

Other ingredients: Calcium Phosphate, Magnesium Stearate, Silicon Dioxide. Gelatin Capsule

Monolaurin contains the monoester of the fatty acid lauric acid.

Contains no corn, yeast, wheat, liver, citrus, or other common food or chemical allergens.  Gluten free.  Manufacturing methods incorporate special delayed release properties.

 

WHAT IS MONOLAURIN
Monolaurin is an anti-microbial agent that protects the immune system from a range of infectious agents. Monolaurin is a glyceride ester derivative of lauric acid, a fatty acid found naturally in breast milk and certain vegetable oils.  This fatty acid has been used as a germicidal agent for centuries.  Lauric acid was originally discovered when microbiologists studied human breast milk to determine the antiviral substances which protected infants from microbial infections. It has been shown to protect newborns, whose immune systems are underdeveloped, from Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) and other respiratory tract viruses (1,2).  Monolaurin was found to have even greater viral activity than lauric acid. As a dietary supplement, Monolaurin has shown exciting results as an anti-viral and anti-bacterial agent.
 

HOW DOES MONOLAURIN WORK
Monolaurin works by destroying lipid-coated viruses such as herpes, cytomegalovirus, influenza, and various pathogenic bacteria and protozoa.

Monolaurin works by binding to the lipid-protein envelope of the virus, thereby preventing it from attaching and entering host cells, making infection and replication impossible.  Other studies show that Monolaurin disintegrates the viral envelope, killing the virus. 
 

WHAT IS MONOLAURIN EFFECTIVE IN TREATING
In general, Monolaurin can help fight colds, flu, EBV, shingles, herpes, and chronic fatigue syndrome.

In studies performed at the Respiratory Virology Branch, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Georgia, Monolaurin was found effective against 14 human RNA and DNA enveloped viruses in cell culture (3). These included influenza, RSV, Rubeola, Newcastle's, Coronavirus, Herpes Simplex types 1 & 2, Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus. (Monolaurin has no effect on naked viruses, such as polio, encephalitis virus, coxsachie, or pox viruses.) Monolaurin removed all measurable infectivity by disintegrating the virus envelope.  In addition to its antiviral effects, monolaurin has also been shown to have antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Groups A, F & G streptococci, Chlamydia, H. pylori, and against yeast and fungi as well, including Candida and ringworm.

 
HOW CAN I PROTECT MYSELF DURING THE COLD AND FLU SEASON

Monolaurin serves as a valuable nutritional adjunct for people who feel that they are coming down with a cold or flu. Many physicians have developed their own clinical protocols in their cold and flu prevention program and recommend taking several capsules of Monolaurin on an empty stomach.

Monolaurin is not the type of nutritional supplement you have to take on a daily basis (although many people take it regularly for prevention purposes), but only when the need arises. If you have a fever or swollen lymph glands, it is always best to see a physician, but if you sense the early warning signs of the flu, like sniffles, sore skin and perhaps a scratchy throat, Monolaurin may offer the first line of defense.
 

ANTIBIOTICS, MONOLAURIN AND THE FLU
Antibiotics kill unwanted micro-organisms, but they also kill many friendly micro-organisms.  Monolaurin, on the other hand, does not appear to have an adverse effect on desirable digestive bacteria, but rather only on unwanted microorganisms. In addition Monolaurin can reduce the resistance of germs to antibiotics.

Frequent antibiotic use can lead to major disruptions in health and especially immune system function.  Antibiotic resistance, resulting from the over-use of prescription drugs, is one of the biggest problems facing the medical community today. Resistance is cumulative (and comes in part from antibiotics in our food supply). That's why it's important to consider starting with nutritional agents, such as Monolaurin, first. Uncomplicated flu, while unpleasant, is not life threatening and doesn't necessitate drug therapy. Nutritional physiologic agents, such as Monolaurin, may be a good first choice.
 

IS MONOLAURIN SAFE
Not only is Monolaurin included on the GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) list, but it may, by virtue of its source of origin, be safer than many other food supplements that are designed to boost the immune system. 

One of the safest substances known to man is breast milk. This is where the monoglyceride of lauric acid (Monolaurin) is found. When an infant is born, it is totally dependent on food factors in the mother's milk for immune protection. In analyzing the composition of human breast milk, medical researchers found lauric acid monoglycerides in high concentrations, which is what led them to study Monolaurin as an anti-viral agent (4,5). Monolaurin is also found in coconut oil, butter, and heavy cream; only recently has it been isolated and purified. It is highly unusual in pharmacology to find chemicals that are toxic to lower forms of life (bacteria, fungi, and viruses) but non-toxic to man.
 

For those who feel as if they are coming down with a viral infection:

  • 600 mg Capsules - 3 capsules of Monolaurin on an empty stomach, first thing in the morning, and for more severe cases, 3 more at night.

For those with a sensitive stomach, Monolaurin can be taken with food. The dose can be tapered off as symptoms decrease. Of course, you should always seek the advice of a physician if you have fever, pain or if symptoms persist.

Young children can also take Monolaurin at a reduced dose.  If you are giving Monolaurin to children (or adults) who have difficulty swallowing capsules, you can break them open and sprinkle the Monolaurin into something such as applesauce or yogurt. 

For Epstein-Bar Virus,  Herpes 1 & 2, or other chronic viral conditions:

  • 600 mg Capsules - 3 capsules of Monolaurin when there is a flare-up
    and 1 capsule as a maintenance dose during dormant periods.

Sometimes the herpes virus can be activated by Monolaurin and then killed, resulting in a Herxheimer-like reaction.  Similar protocols have been used with the Epstein-Barr virus (closely resembling the herpes virus), which may be responsible for Chronic Fatigue and even MS (16, 17).

1. Isaacs CE. The antimicrobial function of milk lipids. Adv. Nutr. Res. 10:271-85, 2001.

2. Welsh JK, May JT. Anti-infective properties of breast milk. J. Pediatrics 94, 1-9, 1979.

3. Hierholzer JC and Kabara JJ. In vitro effects of Monolaurin compounds on enveloped RNA and DNA viruses. J. Food Safety 4:1, 1982.

4. Kabara JJ. Lipids as host-resistance factors of human milk. Nutr. Rev. 38:65, 1980.

5. Silver RK et al. Factors in human milk interfering with influenza-virus activities. Science 123:932-933, 1956.

6. Cohen SS. Strategy for the chemotherapy of infectious diseases. Science 197:431, 1977.

7. Dulbecco A. Interference with viral multi- plication. In: Virology, Dulbecco, A. and Ginsberg, H. edit, Harper & Row, Philadelphia, 1980.

8. Kabara JJ et al. Fatty acids and derivatives as antimicrobial agents. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 2:23, 1972.

9. Sands JA et al. Antiviral effects of fatty acids and derivatives. In: Pharmacological Effects of Lipids. Am. Oil Chem. Soc: Champaign, 1979;75.

10. Beuchat LA. Comparison of antiviral activities of potassium sorbate, sodium benzoate and glycerol and sucrose esters of fatty acids. Appi. Environ. Microbiol. 39:1178, 1980.

11. Sands J et al. Extreme sensitivity of enveloped viruses, including herpes simplex, to long chain unsaturated monoglycerides and alcohols. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 15(1):67-73, 1979.

12. Kohn A. et al. Unsaturated free fatty acids inactivated animal envelope viruses. Arch. Virol. 66:301-306, 1980.

13. Ismail-Cassim, N et al. Inhibition of the uncoating of bovine enterovirus by short chain fatty acids. J. Gen. Virol. 71(10):2283-9, 1990.

14. Rabia S. et al. Inactivation of vesicular stomatitis virus by photosensitization following incubation with a pyrene-fatty acid. Febs. Let. 270(12):9-10, 1990.

15. Boddie RL and Nickerson SE. Evaluation of postmilking teat germicides containing Lauricidin, saturated fatty acids, and lactic acid. J. Dairy Sci. 75(6):1725-30, 1992.

16. Ascherio A., Munger K.L., Lenette E.T., Spiegelman D., Hernan M.A., Olek M.J., Hankinson S.E., and Hunter, D.J. Epstein-Barr virus antibodies and risk of multiple sclerosis: a prospective study. JAMA 286(24:3127-9, Dec. 26th, 2001.

17. Simmons A. Herpes virus and multiple sclerosis. Herpes 8(3):60-3, Nov. 2001.

© 2002 Ecological Formulas/Cardiovascular Research, Ltd.

Lauricidin
Technical information on Lauricidin® (monolaurin) for the Health Professional

The antiviral, antibacterial, and antiprotozoal properties of lauric acid and monolaurin have been recognized for nearly three decades by only a small number of researchers: their work, however, has resulted in 50 or more research papers an numerous U.S. and foreign patents. Prof. Dr. Jon J. Kabara performed the original seminal research in this area of fat research. Kabara (1968) first patented certain fatty acids (FAs) and their derivatives (e.g., monoglycerides (MGs) can have adverse effects on various microorganisms. While nontoxic and approved as a direct food additive by the FDA, monolaurin adversely affects bacteria, yeast, fungi, and enveloped viruses.

Kabara found that the properties that determine the anti-infective action of lipids are related to their structure: e.g., free fatty acids & monoglycerides. The monoglycerides are active; diglycerides and triglycerides are inactive. Of the saturated fatty acids, lauric acid has greater antiviral activity than either caprylic acid (C-8), capric acid (C-10), or myristic acid (C-14).

Fatty acids and monoglycerides produce their killing/inactivating effects by several mechanisms. An early postulated mechanism was the perturbing of the plasma membrane lipid bilayer. The antiviral action attributed to monolaurin is that of fluidizing the lipids and phospholipids in the envelope of the virus, causing the disintegration of the microbial membrane. More recent studies indicate that one antimicrobial effect in bacteria is related to monolaurin's interference with signal transduction/toxin formation (Projan et al 1994). Another antimicrobial effect in viruses is due to lauric acid's interference with virus assembly and viral maturation (Hornung et al 1994). The third mode of action may be on the immune system itself (Witcher et al, 1993).

Hierholzer and Kabara (1982) first reported the antiviral activity of the monoglyceride of lauric acid (monolaurin) on viruses that affect humans.. They showed virucidal effects of monolaurin on enveloped RNA and DNA viruses. This work was done at the Center for Disease Control of the U.S. Public Health Service. This study was carried out using selected virus prototypes or recognized representative strains of enveloped human viruses. All these viruses have a lipid membrane. The presence of a lipid membrane on viruses makes them especially vulnerable to lauric acid and its derivative monolaurin. These initial findings have been confirmed by many other studies.

Research has shown that enveloped viruses are inactivated by added fatty acids and monoglycerides in both human and bovine milk (Isaacs et al 1991). Others (Isaacs et al 1986, 1990, 1991, 1992; Thormar et al 1987) have confirmed Kabara's original statements concerning the effectiveness of monolaurin.

Some of the viruses inactivated by these lipids are the measles virus, herpes simplex virus (HSV-1 and -2), herpes family members (HIV, hepatitis C, vesicular, stomatitis virus (VSV), visna virus, and cytomegalovirus (CMV). Many of the pathogenic organisms reported to be inactivated by these antimicrobial lipids are those know to be responsible for opportunistic infections in HIV -positive individuals. For example, concurrent infection with cytomegalovirus is recognized as a serious complication for HIV positive individuals (Macallan et al 1993).

Thus, it would appear imperative to investigate the practical aspects and the potential benefit of a nutritional supplement such as monolaurin (Lauricidin) for microbial infected individuals. Until now few nutritionists in mainstream nutrition community seem to have recognized the added benefit of antimicrobial lipids in the support of infected patients. These antimicrobial fatty acids and their derivatives are essentially nontoxic to man. According to the published research, lauric acid is one of the best "inactivating" fatty acids, and its monoglyceride is even more effective than the fatty acid alone (Kabara 1978, Sands et al 1978, Fletcher et al 1985, Kabara 1985).

It should be emphasized that lauric acid cannot be taken orally because it is severally irritating. Lauricidin® on the other hand, a derivative of lauric acid chemically bonded to glycerol to form monolaurin, can be taken orally without any problem.
The lipid-coated (envelope) viruses, bacteria and other microorganisms are dependent on host lipids for their lipid constituents. The variability of fatty acids in the foods of individuals as well as the variability from de novo synthesis accounts for the variability of fatty acids in their membranes.

Monolaurin does not appear to have an adverse effect on desirable gut bacteria, but rather on only potentially pathogenic microorganisms. For example, Isaacs et al (1991) reported no inactivation of the common Esherichiacoli or Salmonella enteritidis by monolaurin, but major inactivation of Hemophilus influenza, Staphylococcus epidermis and Group B gram positive streptococcus.

The potentially pathogenic bacteria inactivated by monolaurin include Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Groups A, streptococci-gram-positive organisms, and some gram-negative organisms (Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Helicobacter pylori).

Decreased growth of Staphylococcus aureus and decreased production of toxic shock syndrome toxin-l was shown with monolaurin (Holland et al 1994). Monolaurin was 5000 times more inhibitory against Listeria monocytogenes than ethanol (Oh & Marshall 1993). In vitro monolaurin rapidly inactivate Helicobacter pylori. Of greater significance there appears to be very little development of resistance of the organism to the bactericidal effects (Petschow et al 1996) of these natural antimicrobials.

A number of fungi, yeast, and protozoa are also inactivated or killed by monolaurin. The fungi include several species of ringworm (Isaacs et al 1991). The yeast reported to be affected is Candida albicans (Isaacs et al 1991) The protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia is killed by monoglycerides from hydrolyzed human milk (Hemell et al 1986, Reiner et al 1986, Crouch et al 1991, Isaacs et al 1991).

Chlamydia trachomatis is inactivated by monolaurin (Bergsson et al 1998). Hydrogels containing monocaprin/monolaurin are potent in vitro inactivators of sexually transmitted viruses such as HSV-2 and HIV-1 and bacteria such as Neisserian gonorrhea (Thormar 1999).

Read more: http://www.aviva.ca/article.asp?articleid=13#ixzz1kmYL9F9Z

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FDA. NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT OR CURE ANY DISEASE

  • Orders that are in stock are dispatched daily at 2pm Monday – Friday.
  • Orders placed before 2pm Monday to Friday will be dispatched the same day.
  • Orders placed after 2pm Monday to Friday will be dispatched the next working day.
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For Standard Domestic Orders: We use Royal Mail’s Tracked 48hr delivery service as standard. Royal Mail state a delivery guideline of 1-2 working days for this service, however during busier periods (such as Christmas) this may not always be possible. If your order has not arrived after 2 working days from the date of dispatch please contact us. We have tracking numbers for this service and will be able to assist you in locating your order.

For Expedited Domestic Orders (Next-Day Delivery): Provided that we have received your order by 2pm, we will process and dispatch your order the same day using Royal Mail’s Tracked 24hr delivery service. This service aims to deliver your parcel within 24hrs of the dispatch time – in some instances this may not be possible and delivery may fall within a 48hr period. If you have not received your order after 1 day from the dispatch date please contact us. This is a tracked and insured service and we will be able to assist you in locating your order.

For Standard International Orders: We use Royal Mail International Track (+ Sign), dependent on what the destination country accepts. Royal Mail state a 3-5 working day delivery guideline for this service within Europe, and a 5-7 working day guideline worldwide. However, we have found this is rarely the case outside of major cities, especially during busier periods (such as Christmas) this may not always be possible. This is a tracked and insured service, please contact us if you have not received your delivery within the above stated time-frames and we will assist you in locating your order.

For Expedited International Orders: We are able to offer expedited international shipping worldwide respected couriers. We can use DHL or another courier of your choice, but we are likely to get the best deal from DHL. Please feel free to use the 'Contact Us' form to ask for a DHL quote for your order.

We are able to offer expedited delivery worldwide using various couriers; this is something that we will examine on a case-by-case basis. Please email us and we will investigate your delivery options and let you know what is possible.

If you have selected a shipping method that does not include tracking/insurance then you accept and agree that in the instance that the parcel is lost or delayed, you will not be entitled to a refund or a replacement product, as we will be unable to make a claim for the loss.

We retain proof of postage at all times and reserve the right to use a different shipping method than you have selected in order to give your order added security in certain circumstances (e.g. for extremely high value orders we may upgrade to Courier delivery). In the majority of situations we will respect the customers chosen shipping method. We retain proof of postage for 180 days. After this time it may not be possible to retrieve your proof of postage.

Standard International Orders are not considered 'lost' by postal carriers until 90 days after the dispatch. As such, we will not consider an order to be officially lost until this time has passed. We may consider an order lost before this date based on tracking information and our previous experiences, but this will be examined on a case-by-case basis.